estelraca:

vapaus-ystavyys-tasaarvo:

estelraca:

vapaus-ystavyys-tasaarvo:

lushthemagicdragon:

maybetwice:

ereini0n:

fuckyeahlesmiserables:

So loads of people are pointing out that Rogue One is Les Mis in space, right? Well, if it is, then Jyn is Grantaire and Cassian is Enjolras.

I agree that there’s something of Enjolras in Cassian, but I think that Jyn is more of a Marius – quiet, serious, restrained, stays away from people, her agenda is more intimate than that of other members of the uprising – she does all of it so that her father’s sacrifice will not have been in vain.

I think that if anyone is a Grantaire, that’s K2 – sarcastic, gloomy, and only there for Cassian.

I feel like @lushthemagicdragon will have thoughts here.

Rogue One is not Les Mis in space because they were successful, and they were all people who were actually subjugated and oppressed by the empire. The whole reason why Les Amis failed as opposed to the June Rebellion which happened 2 years later was because they were a bunch of very well educated well off kids who didn’t consider the needs of the poor as well as they thought they did. They genuinely believed that the poor would join them when they were not strong enough in numbers and there was more to lose than to gain.  Les Miserables takes place during a MINOR insurrection that did very little.  Rogue One is about actually successful rebels fighting back and dying for its success.  

BUT If we’re going to make the comparison then I would say yes Grantaire is K2 and Cassian is Enjolras and Jyn would be Marius, but I would not make that comparison too heavily.  It’s a stretch. 

I’m sorry, I know this post is probably months old already but I just have to respond to this.

Firstly, the “June Rebellion which happened 2 years later” IS the one in Les Mis and IS the one that failed. The “successful” revolution was the one two years earlier, in July 1830, although it only succeeded in installing a new king in place of the old. The July Monarchy wasn’t overturned until February 1848.

Secondly, sorry but you are literally getting this whole thing completely backwards. I want to seriously underline this:

THE JUNE UPRISING DIDN’T FAIL BECAUSE THE POOR DIDN’T SUPPORT IT.

IT FAILED BECAUSE THE BOURGEOIS FAILED TO JOIN IN.

Here’s the thing: it was a working class insurrection. 66% of the insurgents were working class and most of the rest were shopkeepers and clerks.

This was a general trend too: all the successful revolutions in France were at least partly backed by the bourgeoisie. 1789, 1830 and 1848 all had significant bourgeois support. As a rule, it’s the working class uprisings that ended up being crushed.

Don’t blame the students who actually allied themselves with the working class. Blame the bourgeois National Guard who allied with the authorities. Or blame the old wealthy high-profile liberal leaders who failed to give the insurrection their public approval which could have turned the bourgeois moderates against the king. Or hey, maybe blame the ACTUAL AUTHORITIES WHO DECIDED TO FORCEFULLY CRUSH ANY SIGNS OF REBELLION AND WHO ALSO LIED TO THEIR TROOPS ABOUT THE WHOLE THING.

I know, I know, none of this is common knowledge and I’m not like expecting everybody to do extensive research on the June Uprising, not even all Les Mis fans. Although you could have at least read the Wikipedia article before trying to actually comment on the events.

(Btw if you or anybody reading this do want to do some research, here’s the starter pack: Louis Blanc’s account & the relevant chapter from Jill Harsin’s book about the revolutions of the early 19th century. For the more detailed (and infinitely cooler) stuff, check out these handy resources.)

What IS a fair criticism is Victor Hugo’s decision to sideline the working class leadership of the insurrection in favour of the student characters in his book. But that’s a whole another topic and that’s why the Printer!Enjolras headcanon exists.

Also remember that Feuilly is canonically a worker. We could also get into the whole topic of “how privileged were the Amis” but I’m not going to. This post is already getting long and besides other people have made that point better.

Reblogging for someone giving lots of good information with good links so that I don’t have to go digging around for anything, and also to give my two cents on Rogue One.

There are tons of parallels to be made between Rogue One and Les Mis (hence why those who overlap between the two are doing so).  And I would say that if you think the *success of a revolution* is what determines its relevancy/legitimacy, then you have missed the point of both stories.  Granted it can be more easily overlooked in the Les Mis musical, but even there the entire point of the finale there is that *it mattered*.  Even if you don’t succeed, even if you go into a tomb that’s just barely illuminated by the dawn, the fact that you tried to make the world a better place matters.

Also if we’re going to map E/R onto any of the Rogue One crew it should be the Force monks.  Chirrut who holds onto his belief until the end, through losing his people and his home, through having his religion defiled and the bones of his temple turned into the greatest murder weapon in the galaxy.  And Baze, who believes in nothing when we meet him, who mocks Chirrut, who stays *for Chirrut*, to protect Chirrut, and then dies with Chirrut’s mantra on his lips for the greater cause that needs them both.

(I’m not entirely sure who I’d map K-2 and Cassian onto.  Maybe Joly and Bossuet?  K-2 does seem to have some caring for how the rebellion goes, though his devotion is mainly to Cassian.  Hmmm, that’s a tough one.)

Reblogging again just for the success point. I was thinking of talking about that too but then decided to cut all that out. But yeah, the whole attitude that “they failed, therefore they shouldn’t have even tried”… what use is that kind of thinking? How has giving up before you even start ever helped anyone?

I can’t resist the urge to link to this Mark Steel video where he’s talks about the French Revolution. (I tried to link straight to the relevant bit at 20:35, hopefully it works. He rambles on a bit but it’s good rambling.) Basically the relevant quote is “What would have happened if there had been no resistance?” and he ties that up with modern protest movements too.

Also the June uprising especially ended up being a big propaganda victory for the republicans. Just look at the effect it had on Victor Hugo who was a supporter of Louis-Philippe at the time. Maybe that’s not as epic as bringing down a super weapon but it’s far from worthless. And by extension… I mean how many people have been inspired by Les Mis? None of that would have happened without all those real people who thought it was worth risking your life fighting for something better, who were so brave that even many of their enemies came to admire them.

… Also that’s a good point about Chirrut and Baze and E&R. 😀 I’m perfectly content seeing the Rogue One crew parallels with Les Amis in a vague and non-specific way but of course it can be fun to make comparisons. (I think Chirrut and Baze could also be compared to Bini because, well, they are definitely “bini” the way Joly and Lesgle are bini, if not even more so.) It’s a bit like with Les Mis 1995 where many of the characters have aspects of multiple Les Mis characters, and the main Les Mis characters all have more than one stand-in in the movie. In that movie it was intentional but Rogue One kind of succeeds in doing the same accidentally.

Thanks for the link to the video–I hadn’t seen that before!

I just couldn’t let the idea that a revolution only matters if it succeeds go, because it’s so antithetical to both these stories (and to the real people and history Les Mis is drawing on).  I mean, *we* know the Rogue One crew succeeded, but I think it’s super important to note that absolutely none of *them* got to know.  All they had was hope, because that’s what you build a rebellion on.  And whether it takes another five years or sixteen to overthrow the oppressive government, the earlier battles are what lay the foundation for what comes later.

Chirrut and Baze could definitely be good Bini as well!  Their death scene just screamed E&R to me and my wife the first time we saw it, and I haven’t been able to shake it.  I like your comparison to the 1995 Les Mis movie–everyone’s a mish-mash of various characters and it’s fun to see what parallels work where.

Great 😀 I’ve been wanting to spread that video lecture around a bit. I think it’s a pretty good sort of a simplified and comedic but still serious explanation of why

the French Revolution mattered and why the level of demonization it gets makes no sense.

And yeah, I agree, I mean there’s a very good reason why Rogue One literally ends with the word “hope“. Maybe it’s a bit on the nose but it kind of needed to be. (Also it definitely made me tear up in the theatre. There may have been a little bit of sobbing even, who knows.)

And it doesn’t have to fit perfectly in terms of plot and conditions for there to be a meaningful comparison to Les Mis. It was always meant to be a universal book anyway.

Yeah you’re right about the death scene. Definite OFPD vibes. Somehow I hadn’t considered it before but yeah.

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pilferingapples:

image

@acelaurens replied to your post


Alignment talk II

pls explain javert? i am curious

Thank you for asking nicely!<3  (and you too, @bookgirlfan !)

(Note: when I talk about Good and Evil in this, I’m talking strictly about the Alignment Chart version rather than broader philosophical/moral concepts. )

I thought about it a LOT before sorting Javert as Lawful Evil. I don’t think anyone’s going to argue with me about the Lawful part!  But geez, the Evil bit…

okay, let me quote from my favorite explanation of the Alignments (quotes in Bold):

A lawful evil villain methodically takes what he wants within the limits of his code of conduct without regard for whom it hurts.

What DOES Javert want? Order, stability, hierarchy. And he doesn’t care if maintaining that means, say,  some poor woman’s kid will starve without the money she’s nearly killing herself to earn. 

He cares about tradition, loyalty, and order but not about freedom, dignity, or life. He plays by the rules but without mercy or compassion.
It’s easy to be kind, right? Javert actively despises that Compassion stuff. 

He is comfortable in a hierarchy and would like to rule, but is willing to serve.
SO willing. Many a kinkfic has been written 😛

He condemns others not according to their actions but according to race, religion, homeland, or social rank. .
Yyyyep. He doesn’t arrest or sentence Fantine for anything she’s DONE, but because she’s a poor prostitute and Bamatabois is a rich property owner. 

He is loath to break laws or promises
IT KIND OF EXPLODES HIM. 

Some lawful evil people and creatures commit themselves to evil with a zeal like that of a crusader committed to good….They may also see doing evil as part of a duty to an evil deity or master.
Like, say, a corrupt hierarchical system that is the real central villain of the book. 

In more detail:

Keep reading

pilferingapples:

I know I rant a lot about the erasure/denial of the political involvement of the French Romantics  by later academics, and I am not about to stop that ranting but like also  

the more I read about the whole situation, the more it seems clear that the most open and openly acknowledged full-on republican members of the movement were people who were stuck with the Standard Oppression Plus social membership deal, either for reasons of class  (like the Borels) , race (like Dumas) , or gender (like Sand).  

This is probably kind of an Obvious thing on its own–shock and surprise, the people on the front lines of social reform movements are the ones who are getting screwed over by the current situation–but given that, the frequent insistence that nope,nuh-uh, these people had nothing really politically or socially significant to say, no, golly, why would  they? Artists and writers, haha, who gets political there? and anyway the whole movement was just a bunch of bourgeois young men! Yeah!

–Well, it seems a little more obvious where that idea is coming from, and even more obvious than before that it’s not coming from anywhere good. :/ 

Of the two parties who are guilty of the present and of the impending mischief, incomparably the most guilty is the Government. That small part of the people of Paris who planned, or who joined the insurrection, are not without considerable excuse. To compare them with our own people under recent circumstances, would be to judge them unfairly. If we English could neither have formed Political Unions nor held public meetings, how could we have escaped the same extremity? And with those powers, it was seen in the case of Catholic emancipation,what even such a people as the Irish could do. Both these invaluable rights are denied to the French nation. There are no means left open in France, by which public dissatisfaction can manifest itself through a peaceable display of moral strength. The press is the only organ of public opinion which exists at all; and the press is weighed down by taxation, and persecuted by the law-officers of Government, to the extent, in the case of one single paper, of fifty-two prosecutions within two years.

John Stuart Mill

There are no means left open in France, by which public dissatisfaction can manifest itself through a peaceable display of moral strength.

(via pilferingapples)

elritch:

vapaus-ystavyys-tasaarvo:

lushthemagicdragon:

maybetwice:

ereini0n:

fuckyeahlesmiserables:

So loads of people are pointing out that Rogue One is Les Mis in space, right? Well, if it is, then Jyn is Grantaire and Cassian is Enjolras.

I agree that there’s something of Enjolras in Cassian, but I think that Jyn is more of a Marius – quiet, serious, restrained, stays away from people, her agenda is more intimate than that of other members of the uprising – she does all of it so that her father’s sacrifice will not have been in vain.

I think that if anyone is a Grantaire, that’s K2 – sarcastic, gloomy, and only there for Cassian.

I feel like @lushthemagicdragon will have thoughts here.

Rogue One is not Les Mis in space because they were successful, and they were all people who were actually subjugated and oppressed by the empire. The whole reason why Les Amis failed as opposed to the June Rebellion which happened 2 years later was because they were a bunch of very well educated well off kids who didn’t consider the needs of the poor as well as they thought they did. They genuinely believed that the poor would join them when they were not strong enough in numbers and there was more to lose than to gain.  Les Miserables takes place during a MINOR insurrection that did very little.  Rogue One is about actually successful rebels fighting back and dying for its success.  

BUT If we’re going to make the comparison then I would say yes Grantaire is K2 and Cassian is Enjolras and Jyn would be Marius, but I would not make that comparison too heavily.  It’s a stretch. 

I’m sorry, I know this post is probably months old already but I just have to respond to this.

Firstly, the “June Rebellion which happened 2 years later” IS the one in Les Mis and IS the one that failed. The “successful” revolution was the one two years earlier, in July 1830, although it only succeeded in installing a new king in place of the old. The July Monarchy wasn’t overturned until February 1848.

Secondly, sorry but you are literally getting this whole thing completely backwards. I want to seriously underline this:

THE JUNE UPRISING DIDN’T FAIL BECAUSE THE POOR DIDN’T SUPPORT IT.

IT FAILED BECAUSE THE BOURGEOIS FAILED TO JOIN IN.

Here’s the thing: it was a working class insurrection. 66% of the insurgents were working class and most of the rest were shopkeepers and clerks.

This was a general trend too: all the successful revolutions in France were at least partly backed by the bourgeoisie. 1789, 1830 and 1848 all had significant bourgeois support. As a rule, it’s the working class uprisings that ended up being crushed.

Don’t blame the students who actually allied themselves with the working class. Blame the bourgeois National Guard who allied with the authorities. Or blame the old wealthy high-profile liberal leaders who failed to give the insurrection their public approval which could have turned the bourgeois moderates against the king. Or hey, maybe blame the ACTUAL AUTHORITIES WHO DECIDED TO FORCEFULLY CRUSH ANY SIGNS OF REBELLION AND WHO ALSO LIED TO THEIR TROOPS ABOUT THE WHOLE THING.

I know, I know, none of this is common knowledge and I’m not like expecting everybody to do extensive research on the June Uprising, not even all Les Mis fans. Although you could have at least read the Wikipedia article before trying to actually comment on the events.

(Btw if you or anybody reading this do want to do some research, here’s the starter pack: Louis Blanc’s account & the relevant chapter from Jill Harsin’s book about the revolutions of the early 19th century. For the more detailed (and infinitely cooler) stuff, check out these handy resources.)

What IS a fair criticism is Victor Hugo’s decision to sideline the working class leadership of the insurrection in favour of the student characters in his book. But that’s a whole another topic and that’s why the Printer!Enjolras headcanon exists.

Also remember that Feuilly is canonically a worker. We could also get into the whole topic of “how privileged were the Amis” but I’m not going to. This post is already getting long and besides other people have made that point better.

@shellcollector‘s tags are amazing: 

#THIS #also the Actual History Facts here are Not Irrelevant when it comes to the kind of purity politics that the post in question stems from #what history in fact indicates is:

#if every single oppressed group has to fight on their own then all the fights will fail

#annie besant didn’t in fact lead the matchwomen’s strike but she sure as hell HELPED to get them publicity and material support #like you don’t have to lie on blue plaques and make her out to be the real leader to acknowledge that #and this does not mean people patting themselves on the back etc #what this means is that the middle class are in fact NOT OFF THE HOOK when it comes to extending solidarity and assistance#and for ‘middle class’ sub in whatever privileged group you please #being like You Must Be This Oppressed To Enter is not? in fact? helpful? #solidarity solidarity SOLIDARITY FOREVER

pilferingapples:

revolutionarypoodle:

pilferingapples:

revolutionarypoodle:

I’m thinking of writing some posts about canon era dog breeds, would anyone be interested?

for the first one im choosing between french spaniel and great pyrenees, what do you think

I don’t know how old this post is but it’s a very important topic and I for one would care a lot 

I’m working on great pyrs right now! I intended to have something up earlier but I’m a little stuck on the spread of the breed beyond the Basque region. (It involves Romanticism, apparently.)

In the meantime I might write something on pugs or papillons…or the Napoleonic war hero barbet named Moustache 😀

Moustache!<3  We must know more! 😀  

@elliotenjolras

estelraca:

vapaus-ystavyys-tasaarvo:

lushthemagicdragon:

maybetwice:

ereini0n:

fuckyeahlesmiserables:

So loads of people are pointing out that Rogue One is Les Mis in space, right? Well, if it is, then Jyn is Grantaire and Cassian is Enjolras.

I agree that there’s something of Enjolras in Cassian, but I think that Jyn is more of a Marius – quiet, serious, restrained, stays away from people, her agenda is more intimate than that of other members of the uprising – she does all of it so that her father’s sacrifice will not have been in vain.

I think that if anyone is a Grantaire, that’s K2 – sarcastic, gloomy, and only there for Cassian.

I feel like @lushthemagicdragon will have thoughts here.

Rogue One is not Les Mis in space because they were successful, and they were all people who were actually subjugated and oppressed by the empire. The whole reason why Les Amis failed as opposed to the June Rebellion which happened 2 years later was because they were a bunch of very well educated well off kids who didn’t consider the needs of the poor as well as they thought they did. They genuinely believed that the poor would join them when they were not strong enough in numbers and there was more to lose than to gain.  Les Miserables takes place during a MINOR insurrection that did very little.  Rogue One is about actually successful rebels fighting back and dying for its success.  

BUT If we’re going to make the comparison then I would say yes Grantaire is K2 and Cassian is Enjolras and Jyn would be Marius, but I would not make that comparison too heavily.  It’s a stretch. 

I’m sorry, I know this post is probably months old already but I just have to respond to this.

Firstly, the “June Rebellion which happened 2 years later” IS the one in Les Mis and IS the one that failed. The “successful” revolution was the one two years earlier, in July 1830, although it only succeeded in installing a new king in place of the old. The July Monarchy wasn’t overturned until February 1848.

Secondly, sorry but you are literally getting this whole thing completely backwards. I want to seriously underline this:

THE JUNE UPRISING DIDN’T FAIL BECAUSE THE POOR DIDN’T SUPPORT IT.

IT FAILED BECAUSE THE BOURGEOIS FAILED TO JOIN IN.

Here’s the thing: it was a working class insurrection. 66% of the insurgents were working class and most of the rest were shopkeepers and clerks.

This was a general trend too: all the successful revolutions in France were at least partly backed by the bourgeoisie. 1789, 1830 and 1848 all had significant bourgeois support. As a rule, it’s the working class uprisings that ended up being crushed.

Don’t blame the students who actually allied themselves with the working class. Blame the bourgeois National Guard who allied with the authorities. Or blame the old wealthy high-profile liberal leaders who failed to give the insurrection their public approval which could have turned the bourgeois moderates against the king. Or hey, maybe blame the ACTUAL AUTHORITIES WHO DECIDED TO FORCEFULLY CRUSH ANY SIGNS OF REBELLION AND WHO ALSO LIED TO THEIR TROOPS ABOUT THE WHOLE THING.

I know, I know, none of this is common knowledge and I’m not like expecting everybody to do extensive research on the June Uprising, not even all Les Mis fans. Although you could have at least read the Wikipedia article before trying to actually comment on the events.

(Btw if you or anybody reading this do want to do some research, here’s the starter pack: Louis Blanc’s account & the relevant chapter from Jill Harsin’s book about the revolutions of the early 19th century. For the more detailed (and infinitely cooler) stuff, check out these handy resources.)

What IS a fair criticism is Victor Hugo’s decision to sideline the working class leadership of the insurrection in favour of the student characters in his book. But that’s a whole another topic and that’s why the Printer!Enjolras headcanon exists.

Also remember that Feuilly is canonically a worker. We could also get into the whole topic of “how privileged were the Amis” but I’m not going to. This post is already getting long and besides other people have made that point better.

Reblogging for someone giving lots of good information with good links so that I don’t have to go digging around for anything, and also to give my two cents on Rogue One.

There are tons of parallels to be made between Rogue One and Les Mis (hence why those who overlap between the two are doing so).  And I would say that if you think the *success of a revolution* is what determines its relevancy/legitimacy, then you have missed the point of both stories.  Granted it can be more easily overlooked in the Les Mis musical, but even there the entire point of the finale there is that *it mattered*.  Even if you don’t succeed, even if you go into a tomb that’s just barely illuminated by the dawn, the fact that you tried to make the world a better place matters.

Also if we’re going to map E/R onto any of the Rogue One crew it should be the Force monks.  Chirrut who holds onto his belief until the end, through losing his people and his home, through having his religion defiled and the bones of his temple turned into the greatest murder weapon in the galaxy.  And Baze, who believes in nothing when we meet him, who mocks Chirrut, who stays *for Chirrut*, to protect Chirrut, and then dies with Chirrut’s mantra on his lips for the greater cause that needs them both.

(I’m not entirely sure who I’d map K-2 and Cassian onto.  Maybe Joly and Bossuet?  K-2 does seem to have some caring for how the rebellion goes, though his devotion is mainly to Cassian.  Hmmm, that’s a tough one.)

Reblogging again just for the success point. I was thinking of talking about that too but then decided to cut all that out. But yeah, the whole attitude that “they failed, therefore they shouldn’t have even tried”… what use is that kind of thinking? How has giving up before you even start ever helped anyone?

I can’t resist the urge to link to this Mark Steel video where he’s talks about the French Revolution. (I tried to link straight to the relevant bit at 20:35, hopefully it works. He rambles on a bit but it’s good rambling.) Basically the relevant quote is “What would have happened if there had been no resistance?” and he ties that up with modern protest movements too.

Also the June uprising especially ended up being a big propaganda victory for the republicans. Just look at the effect it had on Victor Hugo who was a supporter of Louis-Philippe at the time. Maybe that’s not as epic as bringing down a super weapon but it’s far from worthless. And by extension… I mean how many people have been inspired by Les Mis? None of that would have happened without all those real people who thought it was worth risking your life fighting for something better, who were so brave that even many of their enemies came to admire them.

… Also that’s a good point about Chirrut and Baze and E&R. 😀 I’m perfectly content seeing the Rogue One crew parallels with Les Amis in a vague and non-specific way but of course it can be fun to make comparisons. (I think Chirrut and Baze could also be compared to Bini because, well, they are definitely “bini” the way Joly and Lesgle are bini, if not even more so.) It’s a bit like with Les Mis 1995 where many of the characters have aspects of multiple Les Mis characters, and the main Les Mis characters all have more than one stand-in in the movie. In that movie it was intentional but Rogue One kind of succeeds in doing the same accidentally.

lushthemagicdragon:

maybetwice:

ereini0n:

fuckyeahlesmiserables:

So loads of people are pointing out that Rogue One is Les Mis in space, right? Well, if it is, then Jyn is Grantaire and Cassian is Enjolras.

I agree that there’s something of Enjolras in Cassian, but I think that Jyn is more of a Marius – quiet, serious, restrained, stays away from people, her agenda is more intimate than that of other members of the uprising – she does all of it so that her father’s sacrifice will not have been in vain.

I think that if anyone is a Grantaire, that’s K2 – sarcastic, gloomy, and only there for Cassian.

I feel like @lushthemagicdragon will have thoughts here.

Rogue One is not Les Mis in space because they were successful, and they were all people who were actually subjugated and oppressed by the empire. The whole reason why Les Amis failed as opposed to the June Rebellion which happened 2 years later was because they were a bunch of very well educated well off kids who didn’t consider the needs of the poor as well as they thought they did. They genuinely believed that the poor would join them when they were not strong enough in numbers and there was more to lose than to gain.  Les Miserables takes place during a MINOR insurrection that did very little.  Rogue One is about actually successful rebels fighting back and dying for its success.  

BUT If we’re going to make the comparison then I would say yes Grantaire is K2 and Cassian is Enjolras and Jyn would be Marius, but I would not make that comparison too heavily.  It’s a stretch. 

I’m sorry, I know this post is probably months old already but I just have to respond to this.

Firstly, the “June Rebellion which happened 2 years later” IS the one in Les Mis and IS the one that failed. The “successful” revolution was the one two years earlier, in July 1830, although it only succeeded in installing a new king in place of the old. The July Monarchy wasn’t overturned until February 1848.

Secondly, sorry but you are literally getting this whole thing completely backwards. I want to seriously underline this:

THE JUNE UPRISING DIDN’T FAIL BECAUSE THE POOR DIDN’T SUPPORT IT.

IT FAILED BECAUSE THE BOURGEOIS FAILED TO JOIN IN.

Here’s the thing: it was a working class insurrection. 66% of the insurgents were working class and most of the rest were shopkeepers and clerks.

This was a general trend too: all the successful revolutions in France were at least partly backed by the bourgeoisie. 1789, 1830 and 1848 all had significant bourgeois support. As a rule, it’s the working class uprisings that ended up being crushed.

Don’t blame the students who actually allied themselves with the working class. Blame the bourgeois National Guard who allied with the authorities. Or blame the old wealthy high-profile liberal leaders who failed to give the insurrection their public approval which could have turned the bourgeois moderates against the king. Or hey, maybe blame the ACTUAL AUTHORITIES WHO DECIDED TO FORCEFULLY CRUSH ANY SIGNS OF REBELLION AND WHO ALSO LIED TO THEIR TROOPS ABOUT THE WHOLE THING.

I know, I know, none of this is common knowledge and I’m not like expecting everybody to do extensive research on the June Uprising, not even all Les Mis fans. Although you could have at least read the Wikipedia article before trying to actually comment on the events.

(Btw if you or anybody reading this do want to do some research, here’s the starter pack: Louis Blanc’s account & the relevant chapter from Jill Harsin’s book about the revolutions of the early 19th century. For the more detailed (and infinitely cooler) stuff, check out these handy resources.)

What IS a fair criticism is Victor Hugo’s decision to sideline the working class leadership of the insurrection in favour of the student characters in his book. But that’s a whole another topic and that’s why the Printer!Enjolras headcanon exists.

Also remember that Feuilly is canonically a worker. We could also get into the whole topic of “how privileged were the Amis” but I’m not going to. This post is already getting long and besides other people have made that point better.

smoljoly:

vapaus-ystavyys-tasaarvo:

pilferingapples:

smoljoly:

i love how victor hugos birthday has revealed how many weird nicknames we have for him like ok listen

vicky h
vhizzle
angst waffle
angry grandpa

reblog and add more please

others I have seen or used:
Vicky Large
V Hugs
LORD OF HUMAN TEARS (okay that one’s from Tennyson but I am lobbying to bring it back)
Vic-troll-a

Toto, though… I know that’s not a fandom nickname but like that was an actual nickname he had.

No, I shall never get over it.

Toto.

i love learning something new on my posts omg why was he called toto this is the funniest thing im pissing myself

😀 Glad to be of service.

The why is probably just the way French nicknames work? Like vicTOr becomes Toto.