prudencepaccard:

elliotenjolras:

I Miserabili Group Watch

I’d like to introduce everyone to what is unironically my very favorite Les Mis adaptation – the 1964 Italian Miniseries! 

Essential Info

  • When: Every Saturday at 4 PM UTC, starting Saturday, September 3rd. Remember to take Daylight Savings Time into account when converting from UTC!
  • We’ll be watching one or two episodes every week, with an intermission between the two, so it will last for at least five weeks.
  • Where: Slack (on team Shoujo Cosette)
    Whether you have or have not joined the Slack team for the Shoujo Cosette or Dallas Les Mis group watch, or whether or not you have ever even heard of Slack, you are absolutely welcome to join us for this!
  • Just contact me @elliotenjolras (by message or by ask) and I’ll add you to the team, answer any questions, and help you figure out how it works if you’ve never used Slack before!

What’s “I Miserabili” and what’s so special about it?

“I Miserabili” is the Italian name for Les Mis, but in this case refers specifically to the 1964 mini-series. Like any adaptation, it has notes it hits out of the park and others that fall flat, but what makes this series so special for me is that the tone of the whole thing matches the book extremely well, and it pulls on the same emotional strings, in some cases even more so with the addition of the acting and the ability to see it on screen. I can tell that the creators of the series loved Les Mis, the book, as much as I do and for a lot of the same reasons, and so even where it misses the mark, I can forgive it a great deal.

Have you ever wanted “just one adaptation” to include the Bishop’s personality, or more of Fantine before she worked at the factory, or wished the Thernardiers were treated more seriously, or even that Champmathieu’s trial was included in full? This is the adaptation for you.

Have you ever wished just one adaptation would include all of the Amis and focus on their politics specifically? Well, I can’t quite promise you that (a few of them are still missing), but they are given more focus, and allowed to talk about their specific politics, and Feuilly and Combeferre especially are significant characters in their own rights.

Have you never read the book before, and maybe aren’t so keen on tackling a 1400 page novel at the moment, but you love Les Mis and want to get more of a taste of the novel? This is a great version for that, and so is the community surrounding it!

Whether you’ve heard of this series or not (or even watched it before, maybe without subtitles), I’d very much like to share this with you (in a version with English subtitles) and watch it together. Absolutely everyone is welcome, even and especially if you have no idea who I am.

I’ve never heard of Slack. How do I join?

Slack is an online messaging tool (but it also has an application for desktop and mobile) designed for businesses and work teams. Think Skype, but somewhat less buggy and designed better for group collaboration and sharing/uploading files. It’s fairly simple to use, but I can answer any questions that may come up.

The team is called “Team Shoujo Cosette” because Shoujo Cosette is the first adaptation that was hosted on there. 

All you need to do to join is message me and share an email address (it doesn’t have to be your “real” email address, but it does have to receive mail); then, when I add you to the group, you’ll receive instructions in your email for how to join the team!

You can stream the episodes yourself, or links will be provided to download ahead of time if your internet connection is in question (in which case I encourage you to join before Saturday so as to have them downloaded).

I hope to see you all by next week!

omg omg I’m in

All I know of this movie is that it’s one of the most faithful (it has the Orion scene!) and that its faithfulness is inversely proportionate to its budget. It’s one of @trompe-la-mort​‘s favorites and @trompe-la-mort has probably the biggest collection of Les Mis adaptations in the fandom, so that’s saying something.

Sounds like a pretty accurate description to me. 😛 It definitely is the most faithful and complete screen adaptation that I’ve seen at least and I’ve seen a bunch of them. But yeah, it’s also super cheap and it shows. Nothing wrong with that of course if you find that sort of thing charming.

It’s very much a TV adaptation so it’s not very “cinematic” either. (Also IMO you can tell that the director and the scriptwriter were both theatre people first; there’s something very stage-play-ish about the whole series..? Even though it’s obviously way too long to be a stage play.) Buuuut that also means it really focuses on the characters above all and, since it’s so long, it gives even minor characters a ton of screentime which is cool and something I haven’t seen much in other adaptations.

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elliotenjolras:

I Miserabili Group Watch

I’d like to introduce everyone to what is unironically my very favorite Les Mis adaptation – the 1964 Italian Miniseries! 

Essential Info

  • When: Every Saturday at 4 PM UTC, starting Saturday, September 3rd. Remember to take Daylight Savings Time into account when converting from UTC!
  • We’ll be watching one or two episodes every week, with an intermission between the two, so it will last for at least five weeks.
  • Where: Slack (on team Shoujo Cosette)
    Whether you have or have not joined the Slack team for the Shoujo Cosette or Dallas Les Mis group watch, or whether or not you have ever even heard of Slack, you are absolutely welcome to join us for this!
  • Just contact me @elliotenjolras (by message or by ask) and I’ll add you to the team, answer any questions, and help you figure out how it works if you’ve never used Slack before!

What’s “I Miserabili” and what’s so special about it?

“I Miserabili” is the Italian name for Les Mis, but in this case refers specifically to the 1964 mini-series. Like any adaptation, it has notes it hits out of the park and others that fall flat, but what makes this series so special for me is that the tone of the whole thing matches the book extremely well, and it pulls on the same emotional strings, in some cases even more so with the addition of the acting and the ability to see it on screen. I can tell that the creators of the series loved Les Mis, the book, as much as I do and for a lot of the same reasons, and so even where it misses the mark, I can forgive it a great deal.

Have you ever wanted “just one adaptation” to include the Bishop’s personality, or more of Fantine before she worked at the factory, or wished the Thernardiers were treated more seriously, or even that Champmathieu’s trial was included in full? This is the adaptation for you.

Have you ever wished just one adaptation would include all of the Amis and focus on their politics specifically? Well, I can’t quite promise you that (a few of them are still missing), but they are given more focus, and allowed to talk about their specific politics, and Feuilly and Combeferre especially are significant characters in their own rights.

Have you never read the book before, and maybe aren’t so keen on tackling a 1400 page novel at the moment, but you love Les Mis and want to get more of a taste of the novel? This is a great version for that, and so is the community surrounding it!

Whether you’ve heard of this series or not (or even watched it before, maybe without subtitles), I’d very much like to share this with you (in a version with English subtitles) and watch it together. Absolutely everyone is welcome, even and especially if you have no idea who I am.

I’ve never heard of Slack. How do I join?

Slack is an online messaging tool (but it also has an application for desktop and mobile) designed for businesses and work teams. Think Skype, but somewhat less buggy and designed better for group collaboration and sharing/uploading files. It’s fairly simple to use, but I can answer any questions that may come up.

The team is called “Team Shoujo Cosette” because Shoujo Cosette is the first adaptation that was hosted on there. 

All you need to do to join is message me and share an email address (it doesn’t have to be your “real” email address, but it does have to receive mail); then, when I add you to the group, you’ll receive instructions in your email for how to join the team!

You can stream the episodes yourself, or links will be provided to download ahead of time if your internet connection is in question (in which case I encourage you to join before Saturday so as to have them downloaded).

I hope to see you all by next week!

elnas-studies:

Occitan, also known as Provençal, is, in my opinion, one of the most beautiful languages in the world. The language of the troubadours, and the origin of most literature of the rest of Romace language-speaking nations.

Nowadays, Occitània is politically divided in 3 states: France, Italy and Spain (Catalonia), though most of its land and speakers are in the area in France.
The UNESCO Red Book lists some of the dialects of Occitan as “seriously endangered.”

If you speak another Romance language, it will be a lot easier to learn Occitan from that language than from English. Occitan is very close to Catalan, so it will be considerably easier if you speak Catalan (in that case check out the Catalan gov’t’s website regarding Aranese. Full of resources!).

General resources:

  • Orbilat –  overview of the language and basic grammar. Page in English.
  • Occitan at Omniglot – general info about the language, pronunciation of the alphabet and difference among the dialects. In English.
  • occitanet.free.fr – you can access the website in English, French, or Occitan itself. Includes info on the language and a course from French.
  • Bàbel – basic grammar and pronunciation. Page in English.
  • PDF Els Elements Bàsics de la Llengua Occitana to learn Occitan from Catalan. Includes very good explanations and examples, grammar, vocabulary and everything you need. This is the best resource I’ve found so far.
  • Langoland – vocab lists in different dialects of Occitan (Auvergnac, Languedocien, Aranese…) with translation in English and French (click on the topic in the left margin).
  • Academia Occitana – website in Occitan and French. Includes vocabulary lists, verb conjugator, rules of the language, literature examples…
  • Occitània Online – vocabulary lists English-Occitan, Spanish-Occitan, French-Occitan, vocab about informatics E-O, explanations about the language and culture.
  • PanOccitan – website in Occitan and French. Includes flashcards for vocabulary on many different topics, a verb conjugator, and a course from French.
  • Viure a Catalunya versió en aranès – flashcards with drawings and the word in Aranese Occitan. They give you many topics to choose from and the pictures with and without the names. Useful for practise.
  • Provençal Phrasebook – useful sentences and vocabulary. English-Langedocian Occitan.
  • Verbix – verb conjugator
  • Diccionri infantil – flashcards with the word in Aranese Occitan and the translation to Catalan.
  • Forvo – words pronounced by native Occitan speakers (Provençal dialect)

Dictionaries and translators:

  • Glosbe – dictionary English-Occitan and viceversa
  • Freelang – same as above
  • Freelang Fr – dictionary Occitan-French and viceversa
  • itranslate4.eu – automatic translator with 39 languages, including English, French, Spanish, German, Arabic, Russian, Hungarian, Korean, Japanese, Chinese, etc
  • Softcatalà – automatic translator to/from

    English, Catalan, Spanish, French, Portuguese, and Aragonese. (The translations to English sometimes have the sentence structure messed up, but it works well with the other languages)

  • Traductor Gencat – automatic translator to/from Catalan and Spanish (based on the Aranese dialect of Occitan)
  • PanOccitan – dictionary French-Occitan and Occitan-French

Immersion:

Also, since Occitan was the main language of culture in the Middle Ages, it’s possible that your uni or city’s library has some books on it.
And if you live in Catalonia check out Cercle d’Agermanament Occitano-Català if you’re interested in presential courses.

I also recommend checking out this page where you can find a lor of info about Occitan’s history, comparison to other languages/cultures, the oppression it went through, popular sayings, and many more.

Les Mis locations: the Barricades & the Corinthe (the modern location)

vapaus-ystavyys-tasaarvo:

Part 1: maps

Part 2: illustrations

LOOK, I KNOW MOST PEOPLE MIGHT NOT CARE ABOUT THIS BUT THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT TO CERTAIN FRIENDS AND ME SO JUST LET ME INDULGE MYSELF OKAY? OKAY.


Nothing of all this is in existence now. The Mondétour labyrinth was disembowelled and widely opened in 1847, and probably no longer exists at the present moment. The Rue de la Chanvrerie and Corinthe have disappeared beneath the pavement of the Rue Rambuteau.

— History if Corinthe From Its Foundation (4.12.1)

So here’s the thing: Hugo is right about the Rue Rambuteau (named after the official who orchestrated its creation) destroying the Rue de la Chanv(er)rerie and much of its surroundings. This was the first of the wide modern streets in the historical centre of Paris, even before the Haussmann renovations which changed the area even more. And what was left after Rambuteau and Haussmann was mostly finished off by the repeated rebuilding projects of Les Halles.

Buuuuut… there is at least ONE BUILDING on Rue Rambuteau in Les Halles that, despite the fact that it’s clearly been recently renovated, still looks much older in design than the 19th, 20th and even 21st century buildings around it. And since it seems pretty unlikely that recent generations would have intentionally built this kind of a house with its crooked walls and small dimensions, clearly shorter than all the houses around it, AND since it bears a pretty good resemblance to the house on the same spot in the Marville photo, I’m assuming it has to be older, from back when Corinthe, according to Hugo, would likely have been built.

And yeah, as you probably already guessed, I wouldn’t be making such a big deal about this one house if it didn’t stand in the exact location where Corinthe was supposed to have stood. So even with nearly all the ancient houses in that area having been demolished, somehow this specific one managed to survive not only the 19th century but also the 20th. For once Hugo was a bit too pessimistic.

… Okay fine, obviously Corinthe is fictional and was never there and the house doesn’t quite fit the description, having more floors and more windows. But it’s still pretty damn cool to have a canon era house still there.

And yeah, this is the place in that video that A Certain Person posted on Barricade Day. But in case you didn’t know, the construction work has moved on by now! (I guess it’s appropriate since it isn’t Barricade Day anymore so no more barricades…)

image
image

And yes, there is a little café there now which is great. It means you can go inside: (more pictures under the cut)

Keep reading

Reblogging this again because I got some new pictures to add to this post from @midautumnnightdream o/ They’re under the cut!

Hi, just popping in to say that yes, I’m *finally* going to take a break from spamming you all with group watch posts. 😛 @elliotenjolras is hosting the I Miserabili group watch. It’s still the same Slack team and the same time, just a different host! I’ll be there too but just as a participant this time. 😀

(Okay I might reblog the post a few times. But that’s it. No spamming for five weeks minimum, I swear.)

elliotenjolras:

I Miserabili Group Watch

I’d like to introduce everyone to what is unironically my very favorite Les Mis adaptation – the 1964 Italian Miniseries! 

Essential Info

  • When: Every Saturday at 4 PM UTC, starting Saturday, September 3rd. Remember to take Daylight Savings Time into account when converting from UTC!
  • We’ll be watching one or two episodes every week, with an intermission between the two, so it will last for at least five weeks.
  • Where: Slack (on team Shoujo Cosette)
    Whether you have or have not joined the Slack team for the Shoujo Cosette or Dallas Les Mis group watch, or whether or not you have ever even heard of Slack, you are absolutely welcome to join us for this!
  • Just contact me @elliotenjolras (by message or by ask) and I’ll add you to the team, answer any questions, and help you figure out how it works if you’ve never used Slack before!

What’s “I Miserabili” and what’s so special about it?

“I Miserabili” is the Italian name for Les Mis, but in this case refers specifically to the 1964 mini-series. Like any adaptation, it has notes it hits out of the park and others that fall flat, but what makes this series so special for me is that the tone of the whole thing matches the book extremely well, and it pulls on the same emotional strings, in some cases even more so with the addition of the acting and the ability to see it on screen. I can tell that the creators of the series loved Les Mis, the book, as much as I do and for a lot of the same reasons, and so even where it misses the mark, I can forgive it a great deal.

Have you ever wanted “just one adaptation” to include the Bishop’s personality, or more of Fantine before she worked at the factory, or wished the Thernardiers were treated more seriously, or even that Champmathieu’s trial was included in full? This is the adaptation for you.

Have you ever wished just one adaptation would include all of the Amis and focus on their politics specifically? Well, I can’t quite promise you that (a few of them are still missing), but they are given more focus, and allowed to talk about their specific politics, and Feuilly and Combeferre especially are significant characters in their own rights.

Have you never read the book before, and maybe aren’t so keen on tackling a 1400 page novel at the moment, but you love Les Mis and want to get more of a taste of the novel? This is a great version for that, and so is the community surrounding it!

Whether you’ve heard of this series or not (or even watched it before, maybe without subtitles), I’d very much like to share this with you (in a version with English subtitles) and watch it together. Absolutely everyone is welcome, even and especially if you have no idea who I am.

I’ve never heard of Slack. How do I join?

Slack is an online messaging tool (but it also has an application for desktop and mobile) designed for businesses and work teams. Think Skype, but somewhat less buggy and designed better for group collaboration and sharing/uploading files. It’s fairly simple to use, but I can answer any questions that may come up.

The team is called “Team Shoujo Cosette” because Shoujo Cosette is the first adaptation that was hosted on there. 

All you need to do to join is message me and share an email address (it doesn’t have to be your “real” email address, but it does have to receive mail); then, when I add you to the group, you’ll receive instructions in your email for how to join the team!

You can stream the episodes yourself, or links will be provided to download ahead of time if your internet connection is in question (in which case I encourage you to join before Saturday so as to have them downloaded).

I hope to see you all by next week!