spiegelsaals:

apollofastingdionysusdrunk:

spiegelsaals:

apollofastingdionysusdrunk:

I really hate it when people erase Grantaire’s attraction for women in fanfiction, especially when in exr fics

let me introduce you to something call bisexuality

or maybe we could stop throwing around the word “erasure” for every little thing fandom does, cause it becomes super annoying super fast??

like, you don’t read grantaire as gay, fine, but ppl who do aren’t “erasing” anything. like pls, didn’t we just have this same talk about enjolras?

But unlike Grantaire, Enjolras never showed attraction to women. You can make Grantaire and Enjolras fall in love and still write Grantaire as the flirtatious womanizer he is before the relationship.

It’s canon that Grantaire likes women, so yes, I think they are dismissing canon in a way, albeit a small part of it. But really, my problem is the lack of bisexual (or pansexual) presentation, in media as well as in fandom. 

but the thing is, the fandom is not lacking bi ~representation~ at all?? courfeyrac, joly, boussuet, they are all shown as bi most of the time. i’ve read a shit ton of bi grantaire too, so, even if gay grantaire happens, i don’t see what the problem is? is it wrong to have gay ~representation~ now?

is it wrong for me to write eponine as a lesbian, am i dismissing the ~canon~ attraction for marius?

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mendedpixie:

Can the Les Mis fandom stop portraying Enjolras as ONLY terrible? Can we not portray Enjolras as socially awkward quite as much?

Enjolras was charming, but capable of being terrible. 

Enjolras was enigmatic enough to gather a large group of personal friends together for a common cause. Good enough with people to get multiple groups working together, and able to trust him. This is a man who was so inspiring, he was able to get people and friends suffering from melancholy to help him, and get them to do wonderful things themselves. This is a man who was so good with people, and so bright and positive in his personality, that he attracted an alcoholic cynic to his meetings. 

This is an Enjolras that I picture helping out out the poor whenever he can, and not just speaking. This is an Enjolras I picture sitting down for hours with people, just giving a listening ear. 

This is an Enjolras that is so charming and positive, that when he becomes terrible, it’s horrifying. 

This is an Enjolras that shocks his friends when he falls apart at the barricade because he has to shoot a young guardman. 

My Trip to Paris: Saturday Part Three

Earlier parts: One, Two

Ugh, I meant to post this on Tuesday but I just got so sick that I couldn’t. Turns out I probably caught a stomach virus or something in Paris. Or food poisoning. Idk. (And I was already a little sick, actually…)

All I managed was to type a rough version of this post and to transfer the rest of Saturday’s pictures on my computer. Then I just dropped and spend the rest of the day in bed. And yesterday too.

… Ahem, sorry about that. On with the stuff!

In this instalment:

  • Rue de la Verrerie nro 16
  • Apollo’s Underwear
  • La Force prison

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From (former) Rue de l’Homme Armé the next logical place to go was of course Rue de la Verrerie which is right behind the corner (well, the second corner?) This street is so lovely, especially right here. You can smell history. I took a picture of the whole block. (Also the immediate neighbourhood of this block, especially to the east. Go there if you have a chance. It’s so wonderfully medieval. And you can still see where the open sewers used to be! (what? It’s cool!))

And here’s the mysterious Vintage Bar at number 16:

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And another picture of the block from east (or more or less east):

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As I mentioned, we went back to Le Marais on Sunday night, looking for a place to eat (we ended up in a lovely little Corsican restaurant on Rue du Roi de Sicile). I didn’t take pictures of the (former) Rue de l’Homme Armé but I DID take a picture of the Vintage Bar at night. To my disappointment it didn’t seem to be open. Or at least not open to public. There was some weird light inside or at least I think so?

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I have no idea whether it’s a gay bar or not but I do have to point out that basically at least half of the bars on Rue de la Verrerie are gay bars. We walked the whole length of the street on Sunday. Honestly it felt like they were all gay bars but I realise that my perception might have been compromised. x) For many reasons.

Ahem, well, not that it’s relevant information.

EDIT: Turns out it wasn’t a bar at all but an accessory shop! Also now it’s gone; there’s apparently a pâtisserie where it used to be? More about that in the last post.

Back to Saturday. We followed the street to where it turned into Rue du Roi de Sicile (where we’d return to the Corsican restaurant as already mentioned) and stopped at a delightful little café right there (literally called “Little Café”). While we were drinking (hot milk with honey and cinnamon omg why haven’t I ever heard of this before it’s perfect for a cold (because I had one =_=)) I noticed a shop on the side street (Rue du Bourg Tibourg) that amused me enough to go take a picture afterwards:

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Apollo’s Underwear, a men’s wear shop. May or may not be Grantaire’s favourite clothing store.

Oh, in Google Streetview they have a mannekin wearing a red hoodie. Fanon modern!Enjolras, anyone? (Too bad we were there on a Saturday…)

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Okay, okay. On we went all the way to Rue Malher. This is where the prison La Force used to be. Or actually I think Rue Malher might actually go right through where the prison was…? Anyway, north to where Rue Malher joins Rue Pavée there’s a little bit of the prison wall left.

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And onwards is the Historical Library of Paris.

This is the prison where Thénardier & co. were and from which they escaped with help from Montparnasse and Gavroche. I have a feeling I read somewhere that they escaped from the side of Rue de Sévigné (former Rue Culture-Sainte-Catherine) but re-reading the chapter it seems more like that their cells were on that side but they escaped on the south side. It mentions Rue des Ballets which was a precursor to Rue Malher, leading from La Force to Rue Saint-Antoine. I don’t have anymore pictures though. We didn’t even go to the south side.

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And btw, it’s cool to realise how close (well relatively) Gavroche’s Elephant on Place de la Bastille was to the prison. No wonder it didn’t take Montparnasse long to fetch him.

Also it’s weird how close this is to the church where Marius and Cosette got married (and Victor Hugo’s daughter). We didn’t visit the church, unfortunately, but we did see it from Rue Malher.

And hell, here’s a picture of Rue de Sévigné anyway (taken after the museum visit):

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So yeah, Carnavalet Museum was next. But I think I’ll leave that for next time. Not that it’s a long story but these posts seem to get a bit long…

The map for this part:

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Next time:

  • Carnavalet Museum
  • An omelette called Marius
  • Maison de Victor Hugo
  • Place de la Bastille

My trip to Paris: Saturday Part Two

Welcome back to my travelogue. The first instalment is right here.

In this instalment:

  • The actual historical barricade on Rue Saint-Merri
  • Rue de l’Homme Armé nro 7

(Continued straight from last time because I originally meant for this to be one post.)

From there we went back and continued walking Rue Rambuteau until we reached Le Centre Pompidou (that HUGE weird building that comes out of nowhere, named after the president and something idk). We turned south-ish to Rue Saint-Martin and followed it until it meets Rue Saint-Merri. This should be (unless I’ve gotten it completely wrong of course) the site of the last barricade of the 1832 uprising. And I’m going to have to link you to Chanvrerie.net again.

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South-East

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South or South-West (the street doesn’t actually follow cardinal directions), Rue Saint-Martin.

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West, Place Edmont Michelet. (Definitely did NOT exist in 1832.)

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Rue Aubry le Boucher. Approximately to the west but a bit more northwards. Continues east as Rue Saint-Merri.

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North or North-East, Rue Saint-Martin.

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East, Le Centre Pompidou

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More or less east, Rue Saint-Merri.

My dad’s comment was that they definitely made this place un-barricadeable and… well, yeah. It’s so open nowadays. And this is in an area that’s full of really narrow streets. It really kinda seems almost like they specifically targeted this spot. Not that I’m claiming anything. (Then again the same is true for the Les Mis barricade spot. Which is obviously fictional (unless it wasn’t, I mean there could have been a barricade there I guess. This might be verifiable but… not going to try right now.))

Edit: Yeah no, they didn’t demolish this area until way later. Not during the Haussmann renovations.

This is what it used to look like on a map (and yeah this is another one I got from Chanvrerie.net):

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Kind of hard to read but I think this miiight be the most accurate one that I could find quickly?

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Or this one, maybe. There’s a lot of detail in this one and no obvious mistakes that I could notice.

Here’s a completely gratuitous picture of the Fontaine Stravinsky with funny statues and the Church of Saint-Merri in the background. This is just a block away from the barricade spot.

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But, following Rue Saint-Merri deeper into Le Marais!

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And this is where Rue Saint-Merri starts to look more like it probably used to (east of Rue du Renard). Much more barricadeable. (Also from here on I found myself judging practically all streets in Paris based on how barricadeable they are.)

Back to Les Mis! We took a short walk North-East to get to Rue des Archives 40, AKA École Maternelle Publique Archives, AKA Rue de l’Homme Armé nro 7 where Jean Valjean and Cosette moved from Rue Plumet. Yeah, it’s a kindergarten nowadays. Although to my eye it looks way too fancy and pompous for a kindergarten but then again I’m Finnish…

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Rue des Archives southwestwards.

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Rue des Archives northeastwards. The kindergarten is visible on the right.

Also we went back here Sunday night and the place was… a liiittle different. You can’t tell in daytime but at night it becomes apparent that this street is full of gay bars. 😀 Le Marais in general is apparently a gay area but this place is particularly so.

Too bad I didn’t take any more pictures then. My excuse is that my memory card was getting way too full and I was really hungry at the time. Couldn’t think of much else but finding somewhere less gay (… never thought I’d say that) to get something to eat.

Edir: Okay, apparently this might be the wrong place after all? D: Sorry if that’s the case. Can anyone confirm this?

And this portion’s map:

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Of course that wasn’t the end of our Saturday adventure in Le Marais.

Next time!

  • Rue de la Verrerie nro 16
  • Apollo’s Underwear
  • La Force prison
  • Carnavalet Museum
  • An omelette called Marius

(Okay possibly not all of those things in one go…)

My trip to Paris: Saturday Part One

Bonjour Mesdames, Messieurs et Mesautres (?)!

I AM BACK FROM PARIS. WITH PICTURES. (I’M KIND OF HYPER RIGHT NOW. SORRY.)

Okay, so we (we = my dad and me) went there on Friday (17 Oct. 2014) and came back today on Monday (though it might not be Monday anymore when I post this, never mind). So three nights, two full days. I’ll write more on my other blog but this is a Les Mis blog so let’s focus on the Les Mis stuff.

Warning: The pictures are of questionable quality. Sorry. I’m not a photographer and my only cameras were the one on my phone and the one on my tablet.

Also this is pretty picture heavy. And long.

So, Saturday. It was a long day so I split this thing up.

Our first instalment shall be:

  • The barricade on Rue de la Chanv(er)rerie

(It was supposed to be more than this but the post got long!)

Bonus: Rue des Prêcheurs and Rue Saint-Denis.

As it happens, our hotel was very, very well located (the perks of traveling with dad even if it hurts my “street cred” (lol my what)). It was literally right in Les Halles. So the smartest thing to do seemed to be to start with the closest location which was of course The Barricade.

Unfortunately this area happens to be under (eternal) construction and kind of confusing to navigate right now so I trusted dad to lead me there, since he’s more familiar with Paris than me. Of course my request could have been better formed: basically I said I wanted to take Rue Rambuteau to Rue Saint-Denis which dad interpreted as “I want to go to Rue Saint-Denis” and he was really confused when I wasn’t happy with just making it to Rue Saint-Denis.

But well, got to walk along Rue Saint-Denis then. No problem. It’s just that dad seemed really impatient with me what with all this back tracking.

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The first pictures are actually of Rue des Prêcheurs, the street south of Rue Rambuteau, which had the same name even in 1832. It was shortly mentioned in Les Mis:

Enjolras and Courfeyrac had not thought fit to barricade the other fragment of the Rue Mondetour which opens through the Rue des Prêcheurs an issue into the Halles, wishing, no doubt, to preserve a possible communication with the outside, and not entertaining much fear of an attack through the dangerous and difficult street of the Rue des Prêcheurs.

I have no idea what that actually means. But there you go, here’s the dangerous and difficult street. It seems to me to possibly be the same width as it was in 1832. (Though definitely much shorter now.) At least I wouldn’t be surprised if it was. And I imagine Rue de la Chanverrerie was about the same width?

Here is a map from http://chanvrerie.net/
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It’s a cute little street and I think it has a bit more of the old-fashioned air left than Rue Rambuteau.

Next, Rue Saint-Denis from the crossroads with Rue Rambuteau.

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Revolutionary…. Starbucks?

Does anybody know if Rue Saint-Denis is the same width as it used to be? I could well imagine. It used to be kind of a big street, right? But “big street” in Les Halles pre-Haussmann was probably not much bigger than this…

It’s surprisingly easy to go back in time inside your mind on Rue Saint-Denis too, even with all the Starbuckses and whatnot. Not so with Rue Rambuteau.

Okay, I have to apologise for the pictures of Rue Rambuteau. First, I hadn’t figured out how to balance the light on my phone camera yet (I did figure it out during the trip, though! Yay!) and I was kind of distracted by dad who was Very Confused.

Well… at least I know there are better pictures online of this place. >_<;; Luckily.

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So, view from Rue Saint-Denis.

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A nest of bees (don’t ask, I have no idea) at the corner of Rue Pierre Lescot.

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The Corner (where Corinthe would have been).

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Rue Rambuteau from the crossroads with Rue Mondetour.

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Rue Mondetour. And I wish this picture was better because I wanted to do a before and after thing. Here’s the same place (source is again chanvrerie.net) around 1865.

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I actually had this picture with me there! I actually looked at it for comparison while there and showed it to dad too! Why didn’t I try to recreate it better? (Okay, yeah, distracted.)

Here’s the journey so far:

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Next time!

  • The actual historical barricade on Rue Saint-Merri
  • Rue de l’Homme Armé nro 7

(Coming right now, once I get the pictures transferred etc. So might be about half an hour or so.)

The Night of Three Marii

a performance of Les Mis in Dublin that had 3 actors in one night play Marius.
by Chip

There have been many times things have not exactly gone according to plan in Les Mis over the years but this was surely one of the more unique incidents featuring as it did three Marii, none of which was even the regular one, and a supporting cast of highly enthusiastic oysters.

It was late February of 1999 and the UK Tour company was settling into the special Dublin engagement with Colm Wilkinson. Colm was not the only performer to join the cast in Dublin, Matt Rawle had come aboard as Marius and had gone on through previews and opening night without a hitch but just two days later he called in sick. Well not to worry, this cast featured a most excellent understudy in the form of Adrian Smith who normally played Feuilly.

Adrian found out he would be going on that Thursday evening after having sampled some of Dublin’s fresh oysters at the opening night party 48 hours earlier on Tuesday night. He probably should have left the party and checked out Molly Malone and gone with her cockles and muscles instead since the oysters seemed to have taken umbrage at his ingesting them. Though they forgot to bring along a red banner they were about to “rise up” shall we term it and launch a little insurrection of their own soon. In short, they were about to give poor Adrian much grief.

Adrian wasn’t the only one to experience the revolt of the oysters — or was that the revolting oysters? Some of the others attending the opening night gala had come down sick following the incubation period for oyster poisoning which is 24 hours and doctors were dispatched to the fallen. Adrian was still not too queasy by early on Thursday though by curtain time he was starting to feel a bit poorly. But the show must go on as someone once said who obviously never ate tainted oysters in their life.

Adrian went on and as he performed the ensemble roles a Marius plays in the first hour he started to feel more and more sick. Things really got worse by the time Paris rolled around and he went on for the first time as Marius in the show. He soon found that departing the stage that evening after scenes featured a detour to the john as he was far more than merely queasy at this point.. I guess the oysters didn’t have their equity cards in order and felt guilty going on stage illegally and were trying their best to “leave the premises.”

Things got bad then things got worse but what to do? Les Mis casts have at least two understudies for each of the major roles so why not get Adrian to bed and send on the second cover? Well the second cover had left the cast right before the Dublin run and his replacement was brand new and had not yet been rehearsed in the role. So Adrian bravely persevered.

But his condition was deteriorating rapidly. After Thenardier and his gang try to rob Valjean’s house, Valjean rushes in and worries aloud that Javert may have discovered him and Cosette (Poppy Tierney) is suppose to use that moment to turn and rush to the garden gate to spend a few precious seconds holding Marius’ hands. But when Poppy reached the gate that night there was no romantic hand holding going on as Marius was finding the john far more attractive to be near than Cosette by that time.

Well maybe Adrian would feel better after resting during intermission or interval as it is termed over there. Adrian didn’t. Adrian felt worse. Adrian soldiered on.

Now when Adrian left the stage earlier in the show for costume changes and what not he could deal with business off stage. However Marius was now at the barricade for the duration and the students of 1832 didn’t exactly have port-a-potties on the premises. What to do? “Little Fall of Rain” was a bit of a problem since Adrian couldn’t get up and tell poor Éponine (Alex Sharpe) to wait while he used a bucket that had been stationed conveniently in the wings for him by this time. When Éponine expired Marius’ reaction was pretty dramatic though not exactly following the traditional blocking. Adrian waved wildly to the students to come over immediately and as they cradled Éponine and before David Bardsley (Enjolras) could comfort Marius singing “she is the first to fall,” this Marius had dashed off into the wings on the dead run! Rob Miller, filling in for Adrian in the role of Feuilly filled in for him here as well singing the lines, “her name was Éponine, her life was cold and dark but she was unafraid,” which makes one wonder just how Feuilly knew Éponine so well … hmmmmm.

Adrian remained off stage after that for a good while. When Enjolras is suppose to say “Marius, rest,” David, doing some very quick thinking, turned to Feuilly instead and said “Find Marius!”

After returning and getting through his part for a bit longer Adrian had to rush off again during Gavroche’s death. He returned afterwards bringing his little bucket in tow as well as Alison Crowther, a swing with the cast, who was assigned the dubious duty of making sure Adrian hit the pail and not the stage floor. So Adrian took care of business in front of 3000 patrons. The cast tried to screen him as much as possible so I don’t know how many audience members spotted Adrian and wondered at Marius’ inordinate fascination for the bottom of a bucket but hopefully not many.

But it had become obvious by this point that Adrian wasn’t getting any better and there would be no way he could sit there and sing “Empty Chairs” without emptying his chair and rushing off the stage in the process. Now the resident director with this company was Shaun Kerrison who had once been a Marius understudy in London. It was clear what must be done and Shaun went off to get into costume.

In the meantime Adrian was nearly a goner and he finally had to crawl off stage during the final battle and Tom Moss, who was playing his usual role of Joly, was quickly drafted and fell down wounded in his stead. Colm called out to him as Marius several times so no one would think Valjean had decided Joly would make a better match for Cosette then dragged Tom down into the sewers with him. Fortunately Tom was no stranger to the sewers being regularly featured as “The Body” that Thenardier (well know Irish character actor John Kavanagh) dragged in night after night. But Colm had dibs on Tom that night so John had to quickly nab himself a spare body for the occasion.

And Tom Moss that night must have entered the Guiness Book of World Records, Les Mis Division, as having performed the role of Marius for the shortest amount of stage time ever and without singing a single word. Surely a feat of such magnitude that his grandchildren will revel in the glory decades from now.

Well Shaun was ready and in costume in time for “Empty Chairs” and did an outstanding job from there through the end of the show thus holding down the anchor lap of the Marii Relay in fine fashion. It was a night he and Tom and especially poor Adrian will never forget. It was the night of the three Marii!

Both Matt and Adrian needed at least one more day to recover so the following night, just to make things more interesting, a fourth Marii popped up. It was the old second cover, Mark McGee, who had already left the cast but who was returning that day to visit his girlfriend who was still with the company. He was drafted for the day to return to the show and though he never had the chance to actually go on as Marius the whole time he had been with the tour he did that one magical night in Dublin with Colm.

And as Les Mis has an Epilogue so does this Les Mis tale. About a month later Matt came down with laryngitis and had to leave at the end of Act 1 one night. Adrian went on in Act 2 as Marius for the first time since he had shared the role with Tom, Shaun and the oysters chorus. At curtain call Colm not only shared his bow with Adrian but gave him a big grin and “thumbs up” as the cast all warmly applauded not only his efforts of that night but of another memorable one not that long ago. The oysters, not getting the star billing they felt they deserved, were a no show that night. Funny, Adrian didn’t seem to miss them at all.

Victor Davis Hanson – Is the French Revolution Our New Model?

valdsbejakande:

It starts off illustrating the French Revolution with Les Mis, and somehow the quality still manages to go deteriorate

French firebrands saw laws less as absolute, but instead as useful to the degree that they contributed to supposed social justice and coerced redistribution

Right… The laws, not absolute. This is pretty much the most incorrect thing you could say about the ideology of French Revolution. To the revolutionaries, the laws were an expression of the general will, and therefore sacred. Like, that’s the main theme running through any discussion of law that took place at the time. As for the rest… which ones? the dudes who declared property rights to be sacred? 

They ended up not with a Bill of Rights and separation of powers,

They totally did end up with a bill of rights, though. Actually, they didn’t so much end up with one as start off the revolution with one.

but instead with mass executions and Napoleonic tyranny.

The “firebrands” didn’t cause 18 brumaire. The reactionaries did. Not to mention that the American revolution didn’t exactly lead to sunshine and kittens. They didn’t fight their wars with hugs.

Our revolutionary inspirations are now Georges Danton, Jean-Paul Marat and Maximilien de Robespierre, not the Founding Founders.

Congratulations. You’ve upgraded.

I believe one of these revolutions abolished slavery and established universal male suffrage. You’d think it would have been the one that “opted for the freedom of the individual, and divinely endowed absolute rights and values” but history is strange that way.

Victor Davis Hanson – Is the French Revolution Our New Model?